3.  MessageBoard Post between Jim Hoff and Andy/sc-video about why the series died.    

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Jason of Star Command

 

Jason of Star Command


 

The Jason of Star Command Message Board
 

With all due respect John D

 


With all due respect John D, as a fellow fan, I really must disagree with your comments labelling the second season as lame. I've had the opportunity to catch both seasons, and while the first was a lot of fun, I think the second season had better stories, special fx, and character development. It remains one of my favorite shows, and I was so glad to find copies of it on video (for those who don't know traders, I can recommend several good reliable ones).

But back to JOSC season two: Why did it die a quick death? (these are my opinions only, of course):

1)It lost Trekkers with the departure of Doohan
2)It lost sex appeal with the departure of Susan O Hanlon (!), though to the series credit Tamara Dobson's Samantha character was well developed, and probably season two's most interesting character.
3)A season opener which had plenty of tension, but featured one of the silliest plot devices ever used: A "Destructor" projectile, which instead of exploding on contact with a presumed hostile spacecraft, is equipped with a timing device, conveniently allowing Jason precious minutes to show up and save the day. Thankfully, the rest of the season was pleasantly clean of this woefully writing ineptitude.

[John D, please don't take this as an attack: It was not intended as such. Merely a opposing counterpoint.]

-JimH 1965


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1. Why I think JASON died... - sc-video 1969
Like Shazam, Isis, Ark II, etc. maybe CBS felt they had enough episodes "in the can" that they could repeat endlessly without having to pay for new ones.

With Shazam, they had 15 shows the first year. Then seven, then six. Isis had 15, then seven.

I think I read somewhere (an old Starlog, I think) that the network was content to play reruns of Shazam/Isis instead of ordering new shows because they figured "the kids won't know the difference anyway". Sounds like a network executive's way of thinking to me.


 

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